The U.S. Caliber .30 Carbine Stocks & Handguards


The U.S. Carbine Caliber .30


Stock Group

Barrel
Group

Bolt
Group

Receiver
Group

Slides

Stock
Group

Trigger Housing
Group

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Stocks
Handguards (this page)

Handguards

All of the handguards depicted below were made from walnut. The variations in color were/are inherent
with walnut, as with other types of wood. Birch was generally a lighter color than walnut.

Deep Sighting Groove Shallow Sighting Groove 4 rivet
The first handguards had a deep wide cut down the center called the sighting groove. 2 rivets held the plate that engaged the front of the receiver to hold the handguard in place.   The deep cut thinned the wood enough that it would sometimes crack. The design was changed to thicken the wood yet retain enough of a clearance for the sighting groove.   To strengthen the plate that engages the
receiver to hold the handguard in place,
the plate was lengthened and held in
place by 4 rivets instead of 2. The
sight channel remained the same as the
previous design.

Deep Sighting Groove Shallow Sighting Groove 4 rivet

The width of the cuts at the front and/or back of the sighting groove sometimes varied by manufacturer.


Use of the 4 rivet handguards began during the Winter of 1944. The plate mounted to the underside
of the handguard was lengthened to accommodate the 4 rivets. Since all manufacturers but Inland
and Winchester had ceased production during mid 1944, these were only manufactured by or for
Inland and Winchester or for use as replacements.

The majority of handguards have an angle along the top of the handguard that tapered slightly downwards as it approached the 90 degree cut at the front of the handguard (below top).

The taper downwards was slight on some of the handguards used by Winchester in 1943, creating a "bull nose" effect (above bottom).


Handguard Markings


Some handguard manufacturer markings are obvious.


Some are not. In this case the letters TN (top, towards left).
Winchester used an easy to miss small W, though some of their early handguards had no marking.


By Marking

 

By Prime Contractor

MarkingManufacturerUsed By
BR-BMilton Bradley Co.
Springfield, MA
IBM
HI Hillerich & Bradsby Co.
Louisville, KY
Inland
HQ Hillerich & Bradsby Co.
Louisville, KY
Quality Hardware
IO see OI  
 
IP-IR Robert W. Irwin
Grand Rapids, MI
Irwin-Pedersen, Saginaw S'G'
IR-IP Robert W. Irwin
Grand Rapids, MI
Irwin-Pedersen, Saginaw S'G'
JL-B Jamestown Lounge Co.
Jamestown, NY
IBM
LW-B Lumb Woodworking Co.
Poughkeepsie, NY
IBM
M-U Marlin Firearms Co.
New Haven, CT
Underwood
OI S.E. Overton
South Haven, MI
Inland
Pedersen U Pedersen Bros.
Wilton, CT
Underwood
P-U Pedersen Bros.
Wilton, CT
Underwood
Q-RMC Rock-Ola Mfg Co.
Chicago, IL
Quality Hardware
RMC Rock-Ola Mfg Co.
Chicago, IL
Rock-Ola
RSG Robert W. Irwin
Grand Rapids, MI
Saginaw S.G.
SA Springfield Armory
Springfield, MA
replacements
SC-B Sprague & Carleton Co.
Keene, NH
IBM
S-HB Hillerich & Bradsby Co.
Louisville, KY
Standard Products
SJ Jamestown Lounge Co.
Jamestown, NY
Standard Products
TN Trimble Nursery & Furniture Co.
Rochester, NY
National Postal Meter
Trimble/TN Trimble Nursery & Furniture Co.
Rochester, NY
National Postal Meter
W Winchester Repeating Arms
New Haven, CT
Winchester
 
Charts extracted and reproduced from the book War Baby!,
with permission and review by the author, Larry Ruth
Prime Contractor MarkingManufacturer
IBM BR-BMilton Bradley Co.
Springfield, MA
JL-B Jamestown Lounge Co.
Jamestown, NY
LW-B Lumb Woodworking Co.
Poughkeepsie, NY
SC-B Sprague & Carleton Co.
Keene, NH
Inland HI Hillerich & Bradsby Co.
Louisville, KY
OI S.E. Overton
South Haven, MI
Irwin-Pedersen, Saginaw S'G' IP-IR Robert W. Irwin
Grand Rapids, MI
IR-IP Robert W. Irwin
Grand Rapids, MI
National Postal Meter TN Trimble Nursery & Furniture Co.
Rochester, NY
Trimble/TN Trimble Nursery & Furniture Co.
Rochester, NY
Quality Hardware HQ Hillerich & Bradsby Co.
Louisville, KY
Q-RMC Rock-Ola Mfg Co.
Chicago, IL
Rock-Ola RMC Rock-Ola Mfg Co.
Chicago, IL
Saginaw S.G.RSG Robert W. Irwin
Grand Rapids, MI
Saginaw S'G'IP-IR Robert W. Irwin
Grand Rapids, MI
IR-IP Robert W. Irwin
Grand Rapids, MI
Standard Products S-HB Hillerich & Bradsby Co.
Louisville, KY
SJ Jamestown Lounge Co.
Jamestown, NY
Underwood M-U Marlin Firearms Co.
New Haven, CT
Pedersen-U Pedersen Bros.
Wilton, CT
P-U Pedersen Bros.
Wilton, CT
Winchester W Winchester Repeating Arms
New Haven, CT
 
Replacements SA Springfield Armory
Springfield, MA


A Note Regarding Cracks

Wood being wood it is subject to cracks. While a crack can happen anywhere in the handguard there were a couple places it was more prone to happen than anywhere else.

The later handguards were thickened along the sighting channel as the thin wood of the earlier handguards was more likely to crack along the length of the handguard,
usually starting at the front of the handguard.


The most common place for a handguard crack is at the front of the handguard where the wood was thinner to accommodate the barrel band.
These cracks can be difficult to spot without close examination of the bottom of the handguard at the front where the barrel band sits.
This area is also prone to the wood chipping (have a look at the two handguards that precede the picture above).


Should you have questions, assistance is available on our Discussion Forum.

The Discussion Forum also serves as a reference desk for the more advanced material that could easily overwhelm a website and is often subject to opinions that may vary
due to a lack of original documentation. A number of researchers and authors are present on the forums, helping others and seeking information for various research projects.