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Underwood Elliot Fisher

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New2brass View Drop Down
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Dan Pinto, Moderator +, Photo Editor+

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Underwood Elliot Fisher
    Posted: Nov 26 2018 at 5:18pm
It seems many do not look beyond carbine production when looking at the manufacturers.
Case in point, how many know that the Saginaw Steering Gear Division of General Motors also produced the Browning 1919a4 .30 Cal machine gun?

So the quiz here is what else did Underwood Elliot Fisher provide for the war effort besides the manufacture of the M1 carbine. Let us look outside the carbine box!
Edit to add: what I am looking for here is items produced for military contracts. 

Stump me on UEF for 5 points. Points on a sliding scale for items I am aware of but you provide information to back that information such as links or documentation that I have not seen.

Good luck!


Edited by New2brass - Nov 28 2018 at 3:25pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BER911 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 26 2018 at 5:51pm
The obvious is they made typewriters that were used by the US Govt in WWII.  They also made payroll/accounting machines that used an early for of punch cards that contained employees payroll information.  These payroll/accounting machines increased the productivity of the payroll departments in the companies that bought the new "computer".

Did I mention they also made screen doors for US Navy ships and submarines. Ermm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jackp1028 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 26 2018 at 6:49pm
They made a giant typewriter for the 1939 Worlds Fair.

http://www.historybyzim.com/2013/04/the-giant-underwood-master-typewriter/

What this link does not say is that this enormous typewriter was later scrapped for metal to be used for the war effort.




Edited by New2brass - Nov 26 2018 at 7:55pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 26 2018 at 7:53pm
Originally posted by BER911 BER911 wrote:

The obvious is they made typewriters that were used by the US Govt in WWII.  They also made payroll/accounting machines that used an early for of punch cards that contained employees payroll information.  These payroll/accounting machines increased the productivity of the payroll departments in the companies that bought the new "computer".

Did I mention they also made screen doors for US Navy ships and submarines. Ermm

Obvious they made typewriters????? When did they make typewriters? Dead
The typewriter industry ceased production in October 1942 to help with the war effort.
However, you are not wrong in them supplying what they could. As a matter of fact, the American Legion had a drive to collect typewriters to get them to the armed forces.
More on that later.

I may be wrong, but are you thinking of IBM for the punch card computer?
 Underwood did make payroll, accounting and adding machines(look into Underwood Sundstrand )

EDIT TO AD: There was an advertisement article in many newspapers in 1942 titled "a victory on the production front that was won Before the War!
I have not found a legible copy yet. What I can make out is that in that time there was a new payroll deduction that affected millions. UEF Sundstrand got it together to get their payroll machines to do this.
 
 
I believe the screen door was a post-war contract when Underwood was sold to the Italian company Olivetti LOL




Edited by New2brass - Nov 26 2018 at 9:38pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BER911 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2018 at 8:37am
Love the photo of the Italian submarine; no more need be said. Ermm

Here is a link to an old WWII era advertisement for the Underwood Sundstrand payroll/accounting machines.  It was not a computer as we know them today.  Just a punch card data reader.

https://www.amazon.com/Underwood-Elliott-Sundstrand-Payroll-Machines/dp/B005S4D85W

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GotSnlB28 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2018 at 3:53pm
Underwood was subcontracted to make bolts for H&R M1 rifles.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote painter777 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 27 2018 at 4:18pm

Quote "Underwood did make payroll, accounting and adding machines(look into Underwood Sundstrand "

"a new payroll deduction that affected millions. UEF Sundstrand got it together to get their payroll machines to do this."

Sorry, I'm not quite sure how to highlight and reply with quotes.

Before World War II individuals who owed federal tax on their income earned in a particular year paid the tax during the following year in quarterly installments.

Known as Pay as you go..Proposed in 1942, becoming law in 1943, Employers pulled Fed Income Tax from the source... Employees checks. Plus the additional 5% tax increase known as Victory tax.

Is the Answer: Pull Payroll Tax
I'll assume these new payroll machines were capable of calculating and pulling the 'New Fed Income Tax Withholding' from the employees check?
And pull installment payments for War Bond and Stamp fees that the employee may have requested ?

Just to add some reading:
At this same time Underwood wasn't making Typewriters but still wanted to keep their name and products in the consumers thoughts (like most US manufacturers). Instead of slowing down they increased their advertising using the patriotic ads and took advantage of the tax deductions offered by the IRS. These patriotic ads greatly increased War Bond sales.

Details of the IRS position:

The commissioner of the IRS stated,

Advertisements featuring the sale of war bonds, conservation, nutrition or other government objectives and are clearly signed by their corporation, the advertisement will be considered as institutional or goodwill advertising of the manufacturer and hence, deductible, provided, of course, that the expenditure is reasonable and not made in an attempt to avoid proper taxation.

The IRS ruling and clarification in August 1942 cleared the way for advertisers to benefit from a tax deduction as long as the company did not promote a specific product or service and carried a war theme.


 


Edited by New2brass - Nov 28 2018 at 3:19pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 28 2018 at 3:18pm
Originally posted by GotSnlB28 GotSnlB28 wrote:

Underwood was subcontracted to make bolts for H&R M1 rifles.

I am not up on the M1 Garand subcontracted parts, However, if you are talking the H&R U.W. marked bolts I believe that to be Universal Windings subcontract.

Also, I should have been more clear in that I am talking about what Underwood contributed to the WW2 effort.
H&R Garand was a Korean War era.

I would, however, be interested in anything Underwood produced for the government other than the business machines and products that were produced for individuals and businesses 

@ Charlie, If you wish to quote look above to the right of the post you wish to quote. Hit the "Quote" button and it will populate a reply with quote.

Interesting stuff on the payroll deduction, but this was more for workers, thought the GI might have also needed withholding. 

I may be stumped on Underwood "Computer" or was that just a reference to the card punch machine that would be used with something like the IBM card reader computer?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 28 2018 at 3:33pm
@ Bruce, Thank you for the link, was able to piece together a copy.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 28 2018 at 3:52pm
Here is a War Bond advertisement that Underwood used.



And check out this beauty! 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote painter777 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 28 2018 at 4:18pm
 same gal was rescued from an apartment fire at age 78 in 1995


Read this morning that private ownership of Typewriters required an ok by Gov officials during WWII. Without the proper forms they were considered illegal .
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 28 2018 at 4:48pm
Excellent stuff Charlie.
War Production Board Conversion Order of Aug. 4, 1942 Prohibited the manufacturing or assembling of typewriters after Oct. 31, 1942. As a result of this order, the typewriter industry has been converted over to the production of strictly military items.

Underwood made available to the Navy typewriters that they produced and stored before they ceased production.




June 6, 1942 E.J. King, Commander in Chief, United States Navy ordered commanding officers of all Navy vessels to give up half of their typewriters.
This was to afford one typewriter per 127 men on the battleships. This compared to 1 in 5 in civilian use.

April 3, 1943 issue of the Saturday Evening Post had an article "Calling all typewriters" (I need to dig up a copy)
There were other articles as well in other publications pointing out the military need of 600,000 typewriters for the war effort.
Underwood used over 2000 of their salesmen in over 400 cities to help the Government acquire typewriters for the fighting forces.

As mentioned above drives were done to get as many as needed.
Here the Jacksonville Courthouse was giving up 25 percent of their typewriters for the WPB- procurement program



You are correct on the curtail of private ownership of new and used typewriters. I cannot find that info right now but basically, you could get permission to rent on a need basis. this helped so others could get access to typewriters.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote painter777 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 28 2018 at 5:24pm
I believe I've lost track of your initial question ??
Is it 'Other Products' Underwood supplied to the US War effort ? (As in on Contract ?)

In the mean time here is:
More about legalities and some really good pictures from the US Militaria Forum:

http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/11032-wwii-typewriter-question/




This belongs to us now !!


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GotSnlB28 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 28 2018 at 7:48pm
Originally posted by New2brass New2brass wrote:

Originally posted by GotSnlB28 GotSnlB28 wrote:

Underwood was subcontracted to make bolts for H&R M1 rifles.

I am not up on the M1 Garand subcontracted parts, However, if you are talking the H&R U.W. marked bolts I believe that to be Universal Windings subcontract.


Universal Windings did make bolts for H&R, marked U.W., howerever Underwood .U. HRA bolts are the most common.
Pic of one of my bolts: https://imgur.com/a/4LSp6Pn

Not WWII but I thought it to be a worthy mention.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov 29 2018 at 5:30pm
Great stuff! Now I have to add Korean era production to my list of Underwood made items.
What the club would really like to nail down is when Underwood did its rebuild program.
I once found an online want ad for Underwood looking for workers for its "Bolt" program.
I do not remember if it specifically stated carbine no do I remember the year
Unfortunately, the computer soon after crashed and that info was lost.

So now wondering if this was the Garand bolt program? Did they make the post-war carbine bolts at the same time? Did they do the rebuild at the same time?

One answer at times makes for many more questions.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Grendl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Dec 05 2018 at 6:50pm
Originally posted by New2brass New2brass wrote:

And check out this beauty! 



She passed in 2004. https://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-xpm-2004-04-17-0404160947-story.html

Sounds like Mike made it back too :-) 
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