The Carbine Collectors Club
Forum Home Forum Home > The Club > General Discussion > Parts Markings
  New Posts New Posts
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Register Register  Login Login

Stock ID help

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Frankie556 View Drop Down
Recruit
Recruit


Joined: Sep 06 2017
Location: EU
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Frankie556 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Stock ID help
    Posted: Sep 10 2017 at 8:56am
Hello everybody,

I'm Frens from Italy and new to the forum Beer


I've recently registered because I'm looking for some info on a weird (to me) M2 stock I have on my carbine.
The carbine is a commercial Iver Johnson Star & Stripes edition that I inherited from my father last year.

Long story short, my father served in the FFL and then for 25 in the Italian Army; the M1 has been is first issued weapon in both situation so he was really in love with it. Back in 1991 the M1 carbines were hard to find over here because they were still issued to our armed forces, so my mather got his this copy for his birthday. Since he also had access to several GI parts the only thing left from the original Iver are the barrel and receiver Wink

The stock was probably the first thing that was replaced and it's a sort of M2 stock but with different machining inside; I suspect it was made in europe since the recoil plate screw is metric (M5 size). it has been refinished a couple of times over the years and the only marking I can see is a word/name "GITTI". The potbelly portion is also thinner than a regular M2 stock.

here are some pics for you experts










Thanks for your help

Back to Top
W5USMC View Drop Down
On Point
On Point
Avatar

Joined: Apr 29 2017
Location: Missouri
Status: Offline
Points: 145
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W5USMC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 10 2017 at 9:33am
Frankie556,
I know that there are shotguns with this marking: Giueseppe Gitti IT GGI Gardone Val Trompia, Italy, 
Maybe this company also made carbine stocks? 
Wayne
USMC Retired
NRA Life Member
Back to Top
Frankie556 View Drop Down
Recruit
Recruit


Joined: Sep 06 2017
Location: EU
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Frankie556 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 10 2017 at 10:10am
Thanks

Thats a good starting point to do some research.
Besides who Made stock I'm more interested on the purpose of the extra machining in the front.. Looks like extra space for some sort of mount..
Back to Top
New2brass View Drop Down
Hard Corps
Hard Corps
Avatar
Dan Pinto!

Joined: Nov 29 2015
Location: CT
Status: Offline
Points: 1125
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 10 2017 at 10:46am
Frens, Welcome to the forum.
The front may be built or modified to accept the barrel mount for a M3 scope or the
 
U.S. SNIPERSCOPE INFRARED SET NO.1 20,000 VOLTS 
 
If one was to mount this on a later long channel or potbelly the TM5-9342 shows to remove material from that area.
One would also have to modify the hand guard for this mount.
Check out this thread for pictures of the scope.
 
 
Best, Dan
 
 
Back to Top
sleeplessnashadow View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: Nov 09 2015
Location: SoCal
Status: Offline
Points: 360
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sleeplessnashadow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 10 2017 at 12:54pm
Welcome Frankie. Glad you joined us and shared the pics.

I just posted a number of pics on the link New2Brass indicated above this post. They show the sequence of making the cutouts in the stock and handguard for the scope mount designed to be used with the infrared scopes mounted to the carbines.

Your cut in the barrel channel is consistent with the cut for this mount in conjunction with a handgrip bracket that eliminated the need for drilling holes through the stock. The images on the link show the setup.

One thing that wasn't needed for the scope mount is the cut inside the stock running along the bottom of the slide path. Iver Johnson made a 9mm version of their carbine. It required a larger heavier slide than that of the .30 caliber carbines. They welded an extra piece of metal on the bottom of their slides for the extra weight. To accomodate the extra metal they removed the wood in the bottom of the stock as has been done with yours. The 9mm example I have can be seen at http://www.m1carbinesinc.com/carbine_ij9mm.html.



The rough cutout is typical of the cut Iver Johnson did for their 9mm stocks. Someone on your side of the pond may have smoothed it out.

I've seen a number of the Iver Johnson carbines that were exported to Europe, Italy included. I'm not aware of the 9mm version being exported but Iver Johnson was good at using whatever parts (stocks included) were leftover from other projects.

That rounded cut at the rear of the opening for the trigger guard was something Iver Johnson kept doing when they bought Plainfield Machine in 1977. I've seen enough in your pics that I'm convinced your stock was made by Iver Johnson.



The cut in the wood of the long barrel channel isn't something I've seen Iver Johnson do. It's not present on their 9mm carbines either.

Your dad wasn't the only Italian who enjoyed the carbine he was issued...



If you are looking for an authentic WWII U.S. Carbine Euroarms has a pretty good selection they obtained from Zoll in Austria. Scroll down the page at this link and you'll see them....http://www.euroarms.net/SHOWROOM/usa.htm

Jim
Back to Top
sleeplessnashadow View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: Nov 09 2015
Location: SoCal
Status: Offline
Points: 360
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sleeplessnashadow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 10 2017 at 1:17pm
Checking my records, the barrel your Iver Johnson has was used by Iver Johnson in 1985 and 1986. The company went thru a change of owners and when production restarted they used a different barrel.

Their 9mm carbines were also made during that time.

Does your Iver Johnson receiver have "U.S. CARBINE" on top of the front of the receiver or "CARBINE" without the U.S.?

Jim
Back to Top
Frankie556 View Drop Down
Recruit
Recruit


Joined: Sep 06 2017
Location: EU
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Frankie556 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 11 2017 at 1:04pm
Jim thankyou for all the good info!

what makes me think it was not made by I&J is the screw that keep the recoil plate in place that has a metric thread pitch (M5). The screw is slightly thinner than a USGI one so I dont think it's a homemade fix to a stripped original screw or nut.
Also I was always told by my father that he replaced the original stock (the one with the US flag) short after getting the carbine so I dont think he found a replacement stock made by Iver as well.

Anyway another different detail vs the other M2 stock I have is the longer machined area on the side wall.




And the recoil plate area is "unsupported" like early stocks if I'm not mistake (not sure if it's the correct term)



Originally posted by sleeplessnashadow sleeplessnashadow wrote:

Checking my records, the barrel your Iver Johnson has was used by Iver Johnson in 1985 and 1986. The company went thru a change of owners and when production restarted they used a different barrel.

Their 9mm carbines were also made during that time.


So doyou think they used an older barrel to mfg this carbine in 1991?

Originally posted by sleeplessnashadow sleeplessnashadow wrote:

Does your Iver Johnson receiver have "U.S. CARBINE" on top of the front of the receiver or "CARBINE" without the U.S.?

Jim


Just "Carbine"



https://s26.postimg.org/z24rx8b55/Get_File_Attachment-1.jpg
https://s26.postimg.org/apl0wr59l/Get_File_Attachment-2.png
https://s26.postimg.org/pizohid0p/Get_File_Attachment-3.jpg
https://s26.postimg.org/n5hqqhyll/Get_File_Attachment.png


Back to Top
Frankie556 View Drop Down
Recruit
Recruit


Joined: Sep 06 2017
Location: EU
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Frankie556 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 11 2017 at 1:15pm
Originally posted by sleeplessnashadow sleeplessnashadow wrote:

Your dad wasn't the only Italian who enjoyed the carbine he was issued...




cool pics!
My father was a bit older than the guy in the pic (is that you btw?) but I'll see if I can find some cool pics later.

Despite what the internet can say about the M1 and it's cartridge it served him extermely well during the tour in north africa (with the French Foreign Legion) and later in northen Italy (there used to be terrorism in mid 60's).
I also learned shooting with it when I was a kid Big smile


Originally posted by sleeplessnashadow sleeplessnashadow wrote:

If you are looking for an authentic WWII U.S. Carbine Euroarms has a pretty good selection they obtained from Zoll in Austria. Scroll down the page at this link and you'll see them....http://www.euroarms.net/SHOWROOM/usa.htm

Jim


the Italian govt got smart enough years ago and realized he could make some money selling surplus weapons to collectors... I'm trying to contact the Terni Arsenal to ask for my dad issued carbine since I've found a note with the SN of his winchester carbine with rockola barrel Smile
Back to Top
sleeplessnashadow View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: Nov 09 2015
Location: SoCal
Status: Offline
Points: 360
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sleeplessnashadow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 11 2017 at 2:31pm

I need to get some sleep. Will comment more on your carbine and stock tonight.

Few Questions:

1) Take a look at the rear of the receiver at the recoil plate tang. Is it wide like this first one or smaller like the others shown? Any casting mold marks present on the rear?










2) Take a look at the lug on the bottom front of the receiver the trigger housing is pinned too. Is the front of the lug rounded as shown in 2 pics below, or squared like shown in the third pic below?







There are several reasons I'm asking these questions. I'll elaborate further after seeing the answers. Glad you are here.

The Carabinieri holding the carbine volunteered the photo for the web page on Exports/Imports that links to a chart showing the number of carbines provided as Military Assistance to other nations. His e-mail address is located below the picture there, by his request.

http://www.uscarbinecal30.com/imports.html

Jim
Back to Top
floydthecat View Drop Down
Grunt
Grunt


Joined: Oct 13 2016
Location: Mississippi
Status: Offline
Points: 220
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote floydthecat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 11 2017 at 3:02pm
There was mention of the recoil plate retaining screw. I need to add that my IJ 9MM carbine also has the slightly smaller retaining screw with a different thread pitch than a GI screw and escutcheon. I think this may lend more credence to it being IJ as not being an IJ.
Back to Top
Frankie556 View Drop Down
Recruit
Recruit


Joined: Sep 06 2017
Location: EU
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Frankie556 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 12 2017 at 1:11am
Rear lug is narrow with a vertical casting line, and the front receiver lug has the rounded corner.
S/N is AA66xxx If that matters.

Floydthecat, any chance you can find out If the screw is metric?

I'm starting to wonder If the stock is really a replacement as I was told or If my father just removed the US flag emblem.. Were those emblems a simple decal or a metal plate attached deeply into the stock?
Back to Top
floydthecat View Drop Down
Grunt
Grunt


Joined: Oct 13 2016
Location: Mississippi
Status: Offline
Points: 220
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote floydthecat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 12 2017 at 5:09pm
Originally posted by Frankie556 Frankie556 wrote:

Rear lug is narrow with a vertical casting line, and the front receiver lug has the rounded corner.
S/N is AA66xxx If that matters.

Floydthecat, any chance you can find out If the screw is metric?

I'm starting to wonder If the stock is really a replacement as I was told or If my father just removed the US flag emblem.. Were those emblems a simple decal or a metal plate attached deeply into the stock?


AA is surely an IJ serial number gun-wise. I have never checked the pitch on the screw, but as I recall, the USGI screw will not seat in the IJ recoil shield. I think the head is too large, but it's been a while since I paid any attention to that.

I woke-up to a basement with 2-inches of water in it this morning. A water pipe busted....and well, you can figure out the rest. I will be disposed for a while, but when I can, I will take another look at the IJ set-up. It surely sounds to me like it's an IJ stock and recoil plate attachment. Someone could have moved the IJ escutcheon over to a replacement stock, but I would have obtained a GI recoil plate and screw.
Back to Top
sleeplessnashadow View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: Nov 09 2015
Location: SoCal
Status: Offline
Points: 360
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sleeplessnashadow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 13 2017 at 12:05am
Frankie, I needed some time to go back over all the info I have on Iver Johnson.

A background on carbines they produced I think may help clear up a little confusion. I'll address your carbine is a post after this one.

The company was bought by Luis Imperato in the mid 70's. They made no carbines prior. Imperato bought out Plainfield Machine in New Jersey and their entire carbine operation. Initially he simply changed the name on the carbines from Plainfield Machine to Iver Johnson. By 1980 he had switched to using a different cast receiver with different IJ markings. Imperato sold the company in 1983 to a group of investors in Arkansas who moved the entire operation to Jacksonville, AR.

The Arkansas group was not as consistent with what they made as had been done prior. Their focus was on quantity vs quality. They made no receivers for any of their carbines. Initially they used receivers acquired in the purchase of the NJ operation. Then receivers made by Universal Firearms in Hialeah, FL. They bought out Universal but initially left them in FL making the Universal Firearms carbines.

In 1984 they closed Universal Firearms in FL and moved all their equipment and holdings to their Jacksonville, AR facility. Parts used on the Iver Johnson carbines became a mix of IJ parts and Universal Firearms parts. They continued selling carbines in the Universal name until about 1986. The Universal carbines were significantly different than those made by Iver Johnson. Some parts had to be altered to work with the IJ carbines.

Between 1984 and 1986 the carbines made under the Iver Johnson name were a mix of parts acquired from the purchase of the two prior companies and a few parts IJ AR had made. The markings IJ placed on their carbines 1984-1986 changed several times.

Receivers made by Universal in FL were machined from forged steel billets, not cast. They were the only commercial manufacturer in the 20th century to have used the wide recoil plate tang on the rear of their receivers. The top of the front of the receivers by Universal used by IJ had CARBINE absent the usual U.S. preceding it. The markings were rolled into the steel before it was hardened. The font and spacing was unique which also makes them easy to ID. IJ in AR sometimes added markings to these, sometimes not. Some they began placing their name and logo on the left side of the receiver even with the rear sight.

The IJ carbines made 1984-1986 also went through several marking changes with some not running sequential making it look like the markings were up to whoever was working the machine. In reality the receivers were processed in sequence with the serial numbers added later. Markings were sometimes cast with the cast receivers, sometimes not, sometimes a mix of cast and stamped.

1984-1986 was a very difficult time for IJ AR. Financially and acquiring parts they needed. By the end of 1986 the AR group went into bankruptcy and production ceased. Receivers used up to this time had been those by Universal and the cast receivers obtained from NJ. The latter having two distinctively different mold marks.

The IJ group had not paid Imperato per the agreement that was made. Because of this Imperato reacquired Iver Johnson in 1987. He left the operation in the same facility in Jacksonville, AR.

Imperato was confronted with the issues IJ had experienced 1984-1986 regarding parts and receivers. For receivers he acquired cast receivers from yet another casting facility using a different mold providing a different set of mold marks. As with the Plainfield receivers before them and the IJ receivers used in NJ then AR the lug the trigger housing was pinned too retained a curve at the front to provide strength for the lug.

When Imperato restarted production at IJ AR the carbines he made were absent the IJ name. He had changed the name and markings to AMAC. Within a year or so he discontinued the use of AMAC and switched back to the IJ name.

Imperato was a smart business man. He knew people would pay more for "commemorative" carbines commemorating an event in WWII or various state National Guard Units. He'd previously introduced the D-Day and WWII Commemoratives while the operation was still in NJ. He restarted this practice with IJ in AR by 1988 or 1989 with the Stars & Stripes commemoratives followed by the National Guard commemorative carbines. The serial numbers and markings on the carbines were normal production line and not specific to any group. Regular carbines were turned out during the same time period so they serial numbers were intermingled with the commemoratives.

The emblem of the commemoratives is a solid disk inset into the wood. If removed the stock would show it.

GI Recoil plate screws and escutcheon nuts were threaded .200-40 NS. My understanding is the thread size was obsolete by the late 60's or early 70's making commercial replacements difficult to make. Most commercial manufacturers switched to a standard thread size for both their recoil plate screws and the nuts they went into.

Jim

Back to Top
sleeplessnashadow View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: Nov 09 2015
Location: SoCal
Status: Offline
Points: 360
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sleeplessnashadow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 13 2017 at 1:04am
Frankie, now your carbine....

I've been collecting data on IJ carbines for about 11 years. I have data on more than 500 IJ carbines tracking the serial numbers, markings, the locations and various features used over time.

The receiver vertical cast mark appears on the IJ receivers used by Imperato in AR 1987-1990.

The highest serial number I have for the IJ Group before they went into bankruptcy is AA64781. AMAC serial numbers picked up where IJ had left off. The lowest I have is AA64981, the highest AMAC I have is AA66090. Imperato continued with the serial number sequence when he began using the IJ markings again. The lowest of these I have is AA66271. The highest s/n I have for IJ in AR under Imperato is AA73377.

So AA66xxx should be higher than AA66090 and amongst the first IJ carbines made by Imperato in AR. I own AA46014 and AA72105. I did a full photo shoot of AA67812 for it's owner for use in a book he authored. I have a lot of pictures but most are not as detailed as those I've photographed myself.

The markings on top of the front of your receiver are unlike any I've seen before. The CARBINE absent the U.S. is not consistent with the font, font size or spacing used by Universal Firearms. Yours is the only one I've seen absent the U.S. in front of Carbine that's a cast receiver at anytime throughout IJ production anywhere. I suspect this was related to the carbine having been made for export but if so was likely specific to the shipment your carbine came in as other IJ carbines in Europe have the U.S. designation.

I need to correct my earlier post regarding your barrel. AA67812 has the same barrel design so it was used by Imperato after he reacquired the company in AR. Towards the end of production the barrel design changed back to an earlier design. I suspect they were using up all of their left over parts before finally closing for good.

Data I've collected has not included whether the stock has the recoil plate support under the recoil plate or the thread size of the recoil plate screw and nut. Most photographs I have do not show the inside of the stock. Those that do the stock have the long barrel channel and rounded cut at the rear of the trigger guard but are absent the extra cuts inside yours. One thing not completely shown in your picks is whether or not the stock has a cutout for an M2 selector switch. The cut used by IJ in this sometimes included a selector switch cut but sometimes isn't the full cut. It's kind of a 1/3 cut that will not work with a selector switch but extends back past the handguard.

The absence of the commemorative plate or a cut indicating one was there prior just means it wasn't sold in a stock with a commemorative plate. They made and sold non commemorative carbines concurrent to the commemoratives.

Winding down for now, it's been my experience that some of the carbines made for export by various commercial U.S. manufacturers were made to specs requested by a police or government customer as opposed to those exported for commercial retail sales. This may or may not be the case with your stock. Replacement parts for the M1 Carbines have been made by various companies in Europe since the early 1950's for the carbines provided or sold to police agencies and/or as Military Assistance. Some were made to U.S. specs, some were not. With the GI standard for the threads of the recoil plate screw and nut no longer being a U.S. standard it became whatever standard was available that came close. U.S. or metric.

Hope this makes sense. Your stock is consistent with those used by Iver Johnson but it's always possible a European company made replacement stocks using the IJ stocks for their pattern.

The cut inside the front of your stock is consistent with those made for the infrared scope mount. But may have been made in conjunction with the other cuts to accommodate something I'm not familiar with. That cut along the inside right I've never seen before.

Jim
Back to Top
Frankie556 View Drop Down
Recruit
Recruit


Joined: Sep 06 2017
Location: EU
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Frankie556 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 13 2017 at 12:32pm
Ciao Jim,
thanks for the long & interesting reading, you really did a great job over the years!

s/n of my IJ is 66854 and I'll be happy to take more pics if that can help you job.

the lack of US marking: I really dont know what to think, it's possible that IJ made a special run for the Italian market... I've seen other carbines like mine for sale... I'll try to contact the sellers to see how theirs are marked.

back to the stock: I'm 100% sure the carbine came from the factory with the commemorative plate, since all other detail match the IJ production.. it's possible my father swapped it with another non-commemorative carbine.. afterall the gunstore where my mother got it was owned by a very good friend of my family (every single gun my father & I own/owed were bought there since mid 80's!)
still, the "GITTI" marking is confusing..

the M2  cuts: I'll take a closer look later and post the pics later



Back to Top
sleeplessnashadow View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: Nov 09 2015
Location: SoCal
Status: Offline
Points: 360
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sleeplessnashadow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 13 2017 at 12:55pm
Frankie - It would be nice to have a pic that shows the receiver ring markings from straight up looking down on them.

Does it have the Iver Johnson name and owl logo below the stock line below the serial number?

Gitti being an Italian name with each letter hand stamped one at a time may be the name of someone who owned the stock or modified it. Does the barrel, bolt or receiver have any Proof House marks? Are they required on firearms imported into Italy or just the ones made in Italy?

As I recall the carbines for sale by Euroarms has no Italian Proof marks. They do have Austrian Proof marks added before they were exported to Italy.

Does the bolt have any markings on or adjacent the right or left bolt lug?

Jim
Back to Top
Frankie556 View Drop Down
Recruit
Recruit


Joined: Sep 06 2017
Location: EU
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Frankie556 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 13 2017 at 1:14pm
Originally posted by sleeplessnashadow sleeplessnashadow wrote:

Frankie - It would be nice to have a pic that shows the receiver ring markings from straight up looking down on them.


Will do as soon as I can

Originally posted by sleeplessnashadow sleeplessnashadow wrote:

Does it have the Iver Johnson name and owl logo below the stock line below the serial number?


Negative, just the S/N

Originally posted by sleeplessnashadow sleeplessnashadow wrote:

Gitti being an Italian name with each letter hand stamped one at a time may be the name of someone who owned the stock or modified it. Does the barrel, bolt or receiver have any Proof House marks? Are they required on firearms imported into Italy or just the ones made in Italy?

As I recall the carbines for sale by Euroarms has no Italian Proof marks. They do have Austrian Proof marks added before they were exported to Italy.


Proof markings are required on all firearms before being introduced to the Italian market.
if a weapon comes from a country that doesn have a proof marking system, it will be proof tested and marked by our proof house. Pics from Euroarms were taken before the testing I guess.
if a weapon come from an European coutry with an official proof house it doesnt have to be tested and marked again. (ie my Galil SAR comes from Austria with austrian marking, my Colt AR from Germany with german markings, etc)

Originally posted by sleeplessnashadow sleeplessnashadow wrote:

Does the bolt have any markings on or adjacent the right or left bolt lug?

Jim


The original bolt has been replaced with a USGI one but I still have the original one in a box, I'll check that later as well.
Back to Top
Frankie556 View Drop Down
Recruit
Recruit


Joined: Sep 06 2017
Location: EU
Status: Offline
Points: 11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Frankie556 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep 14 2017 at 12:46pm
hey Jim
I'm back with the pics:

The unknow stock M2 cuts:





Receiver markings:
there's a faint proof mark near the words "Carbine" and "Cal"







Molding mark on the rear receiver lug:


Proof marks on the bottom of the barrel:
the "BA" inside the square is the year of testing, 1991
"6726" is the old "National Catalogue Number" not needed anymore since 2011
other markings are related to the over charge testing ect. like the one on the chamber.



I also own an italian issued manual explaining the functioning the M1, M1a1 and M2 carbines.. I dont know if it's direct copy of any american TM manual but there're some cool drawings inside... I can scan them as well if you need it





Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.078 seconds.