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Marksman Jack Lacy at Winchester

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Lupus Dei View Drop Down
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    Posted: Apr 27 2016 at 5:30pm

May 2016-H

MARKSMAN JACK LACY TARGETING A CARBINE AT WINCHESTER, 1943

From the Associated Press, dated July 7, 1943….NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Associated Press, dated July 7, 1943….NEW HAVEN, CONN.

The weapon that won the West- the carbine - may win the war.

The new lightweight carbine, like the Garand, is one of Uncle Sam’s original contributions to the war. Unlike the Garand, it was designed primarily for non-rifle bearing officers and troops.

The carbine is a triple-threat weapon. Part of its job is to replace the .45 automatic pistol and it is now supplied instead of the pistol, to many officers up to and including Majors.

The carbine is also an answer to the "machine pistols" with which the Axis has armed its shock troops. Most important, the carbine is a powerful weapon of offense for Paratroops and Rangers, America’s Commandos.

Expert marksman Jack Lacy, holder of eight world’s shooting records, tests the famous new Winchester carbine on the test range of the pioneer New Haven gun makers. When the guns come off the assembly line, it is Lacy’s job to "line in" the sights.

Lacy is such an unerring shot that if the bullets fail to hit the bull’s-eye it is the gun’s fault, not Lacy’s, and he adjusts the sights until the gun hits true.

The U.S. M1 Carbine was originated by Winchester and is now being manufactured by the company on a steadily increasing scale.

Thanks to Vance Vasquez for contributing this photo.

Note the censored boxes of ammo on the shelf above Mr. Lacy. Also note the profile of the "bullnose" hand guard on this I-slot stock carbine. The flip rear sight is a much darker color than the rest of the carbine. Lastly, someone felt the need to "touch up" Mr. Lacy’s temple, ear lobe, neck and the top of his head!

And what?! - no hearing or eye protection ?!

Marty Black

 

 

 

 

 
Louis Dey
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GoldenGuy View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GoldenGuy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 15 2016 at 9:10am
at first I had thought he was using some form of scope. What is that thing on the wall? maybe some form of mallet.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote m1a1fan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May 15 2016 at 5:45pm
Great article and a sweet I cut 1st prod Winch. Are those stripper clips lying on the table?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RClark9595 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2019 at 2:34pm
That thing he's looking at, could that be some kind of spotter scope, something is holding it in place, otherwise it would fall, although I don't see a hole in the wall for it.
The top boxes of ammo on the shelf, looks pretty much to be USGI issue, that's how they come, 50 round per box, I guess US 30 Carbine M1, 50 rounds, is top secret.
Don't know what the small boxes on his table and shelf contain for sure, but by looking at the bullets on the table, they could be tracers.
Ron

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Dan Pinto, Photo Editor

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2019 at 2:57pm
it looks like a mallet or some form of tool hanging on the wall, not a scope.

Nope, not tracers. his job is sighting in the carbine, using same ammo that soldiers would use
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RClark9595 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2019 at 3:42pm
If that's a mallet  he's looking at, then why is he even looking at it, why is there a hole in the (handle)?Remember this is manufacturing, they use a lot of special tools most are unrecognizable unless you are trained in there use. It could be a spotter scope with a set range, he uses the hole in the end to simulate the rifle sight.

Why wouldn't he use a tracer round if he felt he needed to, that would simply be another tool. Tracers leave a trail to help him visualize how the bullets are traveling to the target.

I was a mechanic for 50 years, I had a tool box full of special tools, most people wouldn't have a clue what they were for.
After 50 years it can be said that I knew what I was doing, but no matter how good I was, I always double checked with the correct tool, there's always a chance I missed something.
Ron

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote W5USMC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2019 at 4:08pm
Originally posted by RClark9595 RClark9595 wrote:

Why wouldn't he use a tracer round if he felt he needed to, that would simply be another tool. Tracers leave a trail to help him visualize how the bullets are traveling to the target.


The AP article is dated 7 July 43, according to WB II tracers were not produced at that time, Memo requesting the development of tracers was Aug 43, 1st shipment of carbine tracers was Sept 43.
Wayne
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Dan Pinto, Photo Editor

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2019 at 4:35pm
Well, well, well......................... It is not attached to the carbine, It is not hanging on the wall...
It is a spotting scope that goes through the wall!
Here is Jack Lacy in 1946 sighting in a Model 70 at Winchester.
Jack Lacy was an internationally known marksman.  When he misses, it's the gun's fault!




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jackp1028 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2019 at 6:03pm
It looks like he has "eye protection" now. That's what happens as we get older.
JackP
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote LMTmonoMan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2019 at 8:09pm
Can you imagine being the guy WRA called back in the day to sight in, or test their rifles in house?

Thanks to the contributors of this thread, as it was a really neat read.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote David Albert Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 24 2019 at 9:04pm
Originally posted by Lupus Dei Lupus Dei wrote:


Lastly, someone felt the need to "touch up" Mr. Lacy’s temple, ear lobe, neck and the top of his head!


This was standard practice for newspaper publishing. I have several examples in my collection where photos were touched up to provide better contrast for black and white block printing.

David Albert
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote New2brass Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2019 at 3:56pm
 1943 comic section of the newspapers by Ripley's


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote shadycon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb 25 2019 at 4:46pm
Look closely at the rear sight.......
M1's are FUN!!!
TSMG's are more FUN!!!
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