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M1 carbine reciever leg

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Stewman View Drop Down
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    Posted: Aug 04 2017 at 4:40am
New to the forum with a question. Bought this standard products a couple years ago and just now noticed that one of the legs had been broken and rewelded back on. Should I fix it better? Leave it alone? Or replace the reciever?



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Ghostman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ghostman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 04 2017 at 5:08am
It actually doesn't look to bad, maybe reparkerize. I'm no Engineer, but all that part of the receiver does is hold the trigger assembly on. No danger of it exploding in your face or other safety issues that I could foresee! It's the opposite end of where the pressure could work on it! I'd leave it alone and enjoy the carbine!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sling00 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 04 2017 at 6:31am
First...Welcome to the forum!  I found in Kuhnhausen's Shop Manual, pg 84 it discusses broken lugs were probably caused by trying to bend the lug or dropping the receiver on a concrete floor.  He has a note regarding successfully repaired rear lugs.  (1) Preheat receiver to 400F, (2) TIG weld filling areas with 4130 rod, (3) remachine areas.  It also states without reheat treating weld transitions and fill areas typically remain after reparkerizing.  It's kind of early in the morning, but if I have this pictured in my mind correctly, the only forces I can think of on the lug are when the bolt retracts and is cocking the hammer.  Once cocked, there is no force other than the weight of the trigger housing assembly. 

Based on my simplified thoughts, I tend to agree with Ghostman to leave it alone and have fun. There are other forum members with metal working skills who can really help out on this question.  

Thanks for asking and I look forward to seeing the replies.
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manteo97 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote manteo97 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 08 2017 at 3:30pm
I have welded a front tang back on a receiver (flux core with preheat), with no detrimental results. Tang was broken off when a "gunsmith" tried to remove a barrel. I also have a receiver with the front tang brazed back on. No loss of hardness in the receiver ring area. Again, no real problem.

Welding of any kind should not be attempted in trying to put a torch/saw cut receiver back together (ie a re-weld), or a cracked receiver ring (due to over-tightening a barrel).

Stewman, you are probably just fine with this repair on the leg here. It's not a TIG weld (preferred), and not an attractive weld, but functional consider the area it's in on the receiver.

Ted
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote floydthecat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 08 2017 at 7:34pm
As Ted would surely know, some of the commercial carbine manufacturers welded gas blocks on barrels and front lugs on receivers. Iver Johnson modified and used thousands of forged steel receivers left-over from the acquisition of Universal. They converted those dual-spring receivers to single-spring receivers by replacing the front lug, which they brazed in place. I have one of those. It's a regular shooter and has not fell-apart....yet.
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sling00 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sling00 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 09 2017 at 5:53am
Thanks manteo97 for your help.  I was hoping you would see this post.
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m1a1fan View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote m1a1fan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 10 2017 at 8:08am
Have seen some pretty bad weld jobs on torch cut receivers. Scary bad. Have seen one receiver leg weld job in person but did not get a picture. It was perfect and the person that did it knew what they were doing.
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sling00 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sling00 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug 10 2017 at 9:17am
I was glad to see Kuhnhausen's Shop Manual describe how to repair them.  That's a good thing to know if you ever break one or find a real deal on one with a broke lug. 
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